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Closing The Gender Gap in the Tech Industry

Take a look around at your office space right now and do a quick count of men vs. women. I know that in my current work space, around 90% of people are men. By no means is this another “men vs. women” post. According to the National Centre for Women and Information Technology, 26% of professional computing occupations in the U.S workforce are held by women and even more alarmingly, women only gain one in twenty new STEM jobs, versus men, who are one in four. Outlined in The Industry Gender Gap Report, it is made clear that “If current industry gender gap trends persist and labour market transformation towards new and emerging roles in computer, technology and engineering-related fields continues to outpace the rate at which women are currently entering those types of jobs, women are at risk of losing out on tomorrow’s best job opportunities”.


At this stage, the numbers are alarming, in that they show women as having minimal influence over helping shape the technology industry and so, change is imperative. However change can only come given the right emphasis on diversity and inclusion in the workforce and the promotion of the correct culture.

One key way is to increase awareness, especially in young girls, from their school days. In an article written by Susan Wokcicki, employee of Google, she talks about her passion about women in technology and how that has related to her family life. Susan says that they had one family computer in the house, which her son ‘conquered’ and consequently, her daughter, being unable to access it, was left to find another hobby.

The same happening in schools across America. Girls are taught that being in the computer or technology industry is an isolated profession, perhaps not lending well to a work-life balance.

In order for jobs and employment rate of women to rise, girls should be taught from an early age as to the impact they can have and change they can affect in the tech industry. Technology is revolutionizing almost every part of our life at an unprecedented pace. Yet today, women hold only 26 percent of all tech jobs.

Check out this video trailer of Lesley Chilcott, who is creating a new documentary about the role girls can play in technology. Let it not be about boys versus girls, but rather, using technology to solve a problem in society.